Book News Wrap Up (3rd July 2014)

0
1864

Lots of bookish news this week; some of it exciting and some of it sad.

– – –

An adult novel by Judy Blume, her first since 1998’s Summer Sisters, is set to be released next summer. In a statement from her publisher, Alfred P. Knopf, Blume said, “I’m both thrilled and terrified, my usual feelings at this point. I’ll be hiding out this summer revising, my favorite part of the process.”

– – –

As reported exclusively by Deadline, Jenny Han’s To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before has been optioned for film. Will Smith’s Overbook Entertainment purchased the rights and Annie Neal is set to write the screenplay. The bestselling novel was just released in April.

– – –

Screenwriter Ashleigh Powell will adapt Brad Thor’s The Athena Project for Warner Brothers. The 2011 novel tells the tale of a four-woman Delta Force team on a mission to capture an arms dealer after a deadly terrorist attack. UFC fighter Ronda Roussey is already attached to star in the proposed film.

– – –

The second time may be the charm for Neil Gaiman’s American Gods. After HBO passed on a series based on the Hugo Award-winning novel, Starz swooped in to adapt it. Not only that, the network has made a script-to-series commitment. If they like the pilot script the show will go straight to series. Bryan Fuller (“Hannibal”) and Michael Green (“Heroes”) have been tapped as showrunners.

– – –

Acclaimed young adult novelist Walter Dean Myers has died after a brief illness. He was 76. Myers wrote more than 100 books during his lifetime including Monster, Fallen Angels and Dope Sick. He was well known for deftly tackling difficult subjects and for writing nuanced portrayals of young African Americans. Earlier this year in an op-ed for the New York Times, “Where Are the people of color in Children’s Books?”, Myers stated, “…I am a writer, but I also see myself as something of a landscape artist. I paint pictures of scenes for inner-city youth that are familiar, and I people the scenes with brothers and aunts and friends they all have met. Thousands of young people have come to me saying that they love my books for some reason or the other, but I strongly suspect that what they have found in my pages is the same thing I found in [James Baldwin’s] ‘Sonny’s Blues.’ They have been struck by the recognition of themselves in the story, a validation of their existence as human beings, an acknowledgment of their value by someone who understands who they are. It is the shock of recognition at its highest level.”

He will be missed.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here